English – Research

About me

london3I am a head of psychologists and a CBT psychotherapist (academic diplomas recognized as equivalent by PsiCo in Switzerland, and registered at both Albo degli psicologi del Lazio n.18407 and FSP) with a PhD in Cognitive Neurosciences.

As a Psychotherapist I like to help people to find the correct strategies to solve their problems. As a researcher I like to study how our brain works using statistical analysis of our behavior and brain connectivity.

I received my degree in Psychology from La Sapienza University of Rome in 2010. Four years later, I obtained the postgraduate diploma in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) from Centre of Research in Psychotherapy (CRP) in Rome, Italy. During my Master thesis writing, I worked at the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, La Sapienza University of Rome, as research fellow. This experience was crucial to me for starting my academic career.
In 2015, I obtained a Ph.D in Cognitive Neurosciences at Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) under the supervision of Prof. Wim Gevers, head of AB&C group (CRCN). My Ph.D was funded by the FNRS grant (Aspirant F.R.S.-FNRS). My research focuses on numerical cognition and spatial attention. In collaboration with the University of Chicago, I developed my scientific research on studying emotion. This topic has been my research interest at University of Zurich in Switzerland.

Since 2017, I worked for several years as psychologist and CBT psychotherapist FSP at Réseau Santé Mentale SA, now integrated into the Hôpital du Jura Bernoise SA – Pôle santé mentale,  in Canton of Bern, where I was involved in scientific projects studying affective neurosciences.

Since 2019, I worked as psychologist and CBT psychotherapist FSP at Hôpital Psychiatrique de Jour pour Adulte (HPJA) de la République et Canton du Jura.

In 2023, I started my position as head of psychologists and psychotherapists at Les Toises – Psychiatry and psychotherapy center in Biel/Bienne, Switzerland.

I’m a CBT supervisor at University of Lausanne, University of Basel and University of Genève.

Publications

Research papers:

  • Contribution of visuospatial attention, short-term memory and executive functions to performance in number interval bisection [PDF]
  • Gaze modulates non-propositional reasoning: further evidence for spatial representation of reasoning premises. [PDF]
  • S7.2 Single unit activity, multi unit activity and local field potential in macaque’s motor cortex are modulated by median nerve stimulation [PDF]

Poster presentations:

    • Carbé K., Courrance S., Rodriguez Diaz D. & Hodé Y. Efficacité d’une filière de soin selon l’approche TCC dans le traitement de la dépression : Résultats d’une étude pilote, 2emeColloque Francophone de Pratiques en TCC, 2018, Geneva, Switzerland.
    • Carbé K., Rodriguez Diaz D. & Hodé Y. Cognitive restructuring techniques in depression treatment: A comparison between TBCT and REBT procedures in adults, The 47th Congress of The European Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (EABCT), 2017, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    • Ranzini M., Carbè K. & Gevers W. Contribution of visuospatial attention, short-term memory and executive functions to performance in number interval bisection, The annual meeting of the Belgian Association for Psychological Sciences (BAPS), 2017, Brussels, Belgium.
    • Carbè K., & Gevers W. Investigating the spatial representation of magnitude information and emotional valence concepts, 32nd European Workshop on Cognitive Neuropsychology (EWCN), 2014, Bressanone, Italy.
    • Carbè K., Ginsburg V., Ranzini M. & Gevers W. Investigating the spatial coding with magnitude concepts, 18th Conference of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology (ESCOP), 2013, Budapest, Hungary.
    • Carbè K., Ginsburg V., Ranzini M. & Gevers W., An investigation of spatial coding using abstract magnitude related concepts, The annual meeting of the Belgian Association for Psychological Sciences (BAPS), 2013, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium.
    • Carbè K., Ginsburg V. & Gevers W., Coding of abstract and concrete related magnitude concepts, 5th Expert Meeting of Mathematical Thinking and Learning, 2013, Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    • Carbè K., Ginsburg V. & Gevers W., Abstract and concrete related magnitude concepts: investigating the conceptual account, 5éme Journée des Doctorants (JDD), 2012, Brussels, Belgium.

Oral presentations:

    • Carbè K., Pitt B., Casasanto D., & Gevers W., Spatial coding of emotion, The 4th annual meeting of FNRS – Groupe de Contact “Numbers and the Brain”, Advances in Numerical Cognition Research, 2015, Priorij Corsendonk, Belgium.
    • Carbè K., Pitt B., Casasanto D., Gevers W., “Do people spatialize emotion?”, PPM Department of psychology, The University of Chicago, 2014, Chicago, USA.
    • Carbè K., Ranzini M., & Gevers W., A study on the spatial representation of magnitude information and emotional valence concepts, The 3rd annual meeting of FNRS – Groupe de Contact “Numbers and the Brain”, Advances in Numerical Cognition Research, 2014, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium.
    • Carbè K., Ginsburg V., Ranzini M. & Gevers W., Spatial coding of abstract magnitude concepts and numbers, 6éme Journée des Doctorants (JDD), 2013, Brussels, Belgium.
    • Carbè K., Ginsburg V. & Gevers W., Magnitude and spatial processing: investigating the conceptual account, The 1stannual joint meeting of the Belgian Association for Psychological Science (BAPS) and the Sociedad Española de Psicología Experimental (SEPEX), 2012, Liège, Belgium.
    • Carbè K., Ginsburg V. & Gevers W., Investigating the lateralized processing of abstract and concrete magnitude related concepts, The 1st annual meeting of FNRS – Groupe de Contact “Numbers and the Brain”, Advances in Numerical Cognition Research, 2012, Brussels, Belgium.
    • Papazachariadis O., Cappiello L., Carbé K., Ferraina S., “Single unit activity, multi unit activity and local field potential in macaque’s motor cortex are modulated by median nerve stimulation”, 14th European Congress on Clinical Neurophysiology, 2011, Rome, Italy.

Interviews:

  • “Le sport: un allié face à la dépression.” Interview for Ligne de Vie, Le magazine de l’Hôpital du Jura bernois SA, n.14, Mai 2018, Bienne, Suisse.

Ph.D Thesis – Abstract

Spatial coding of abstract concepts

blue_cover_thesis_okeeffe_skyaboveclouds-copyAbstract concepts seem to be related to space dimension. Evidence of this relation refers to the domain of numerical cognition. An example is the SNARC effect (Spatial Numerical Association of Response Codes, Dehaene, Bossini, and Giraux 1993), which consists in the observation that people react faster to small number with the left hand and to large number with the right hand. This number-space interaction has been explained according to the mental number line hypothesis (e.g., Restle 1970; Dehaene, Bossini, and Giraux 1993), which claims that the representation of numbers has the form of a horizontal line upon which numbers are represented from left to right. Recently, an alternative account suggests that the association between numbers and space results from a decision process to categorize numbers as “small” and “large” before being associated with space dimension (e.g., Gevers et al. 2006, 2010; Van Opstal and Verguts 2013). The first goal of this thesis is investigating the spatial coding of numbers. In a first study, magnitude concepts such as “small” and “large” were observed to be spatially organized like numbers. In a second study, these magnitude concepts were intermixed with numbers in a reversal design (e.g., Notebaert et al. 2006). In this study, responding as incompatible to magnitude concepts with hand or foot was observed to reverse the spatial mapping of numbers, supporting the idea that the congruency between numbers and space results from conceptual coding of magnitude (e.g., Gevers et al. 2006, 2010; see also Van Opstal and Verguts 2013). Further evidence of association between abstract concepts and space has been provided also in the domain of emotion. On one hand, Casasanto (2009) demonstrated that people spontaneously associate positive valence with the side of space congruent to the dominant hand. On the other hand, Holmes and Lourenco (2011) observed that emotional expressions are left-to-right spatially organized with increasing in happiness/angriness rather than positive/negative valence. A second aim of this thesis is focused on investigating the spatial coding of emotion. This was meant to understand how general are the spatial mechanisms. In a third study, the reversal paradigm (e.g., Notebaert et al. 2006) was adopted to investigate the processing mechanism underlying spatial coding of numbers and emotional valence concepts. Manipulation of the mapping between valence concepts and lateralized responses did not influence the spatial coding of numbers, suggesting a separate underlying architecture. Finally, in a fourth study, spatial coding of emotion was observed according to both valence and arousal dimensions (Casasanto 2009; Holmes and Lourenco 2011).

Thesis available in www.difusion.ulb.ac.be